CP7 (DAVE)


Comm Frequency: TBA

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: ~1W

Project Status: In development

Satellite Name: Dave  (Damping And Vibrations Experiment)

School: California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Mission Particle Damper Experiment

Launch Date: TBA

 

Abstract

Particle dampers are mechanical damping devices that consist of an enclosed cavity filled with particles. When the particles are subjected to vibration the momentum exchanges and frictional forces of these particles create a damping effect that can be optimized to suit a number of applications over a broad frequency and amplitude range. In space based applications, these particle dampers could potentially serve as a robust and simple device to eliminate jitter in optical assemblies or other sensitive scientific equipment. However, particle dampers have never been tested in a microgravity environment, and modeling their performance in microgravity proves problematic, as their effectiveness is highly nonlinear and dependent on orientation with gravity. The proposed experiment provides data to characterize two variations of these dampers under microgravity conditions. Their performance will be compared to a control and ground based test. The experimental set up consists of the two particle damper configurations and one mass model control, each fixed to a cantilever beam. These beams are driven over a frequency range centered on their first mode resonant frequency. Through the observation of their steady state response, a mathematical model is used to assess the damper performance. By repeating this test under a range of input amplitudes, the degree of nonlinearity in the dampers is ascertained. The conclusions of this experiment will determine the feasibility of using particle dampers in space and provide reliable models on which to base further investigation or actual space based applications.

Project History

The PolySat team has developed a test apparatus and flown it with the NASA Reduced Gravity Flight Program. The final report can be found here.

Media

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CP9 (LEO)


Comm Frequency: TBA

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: TBD

Project Status: In Development, Selected for CSLI

Satellite Name: LEO (Launch Environment Observer)

School: California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Mission P-POD launch environment telemetry study

Launch Date: TBA

 

Project History

The CP9 mission is a collaboration between PolySat and Merritt Island High School, and is sponsored by NASA Launch Services Program (LSP). PolySat is developing a 2U CubeSat, CP9, and Merritt Island high school is developing StangSat, a 1U.

Mission

The CP9-StangSat mission will measure and record in-situ telemetry data from within the P-POD during launch.  Specifically, the CP9 and StangSat CubeSats will record thermal data with a k-type thermocouple and dynamic data using two sets of accelerometers measuring ranges of ±25g and ±200g. In addition to collecting the telemetry data during launch, the CP9-StangSat mission will demonstrate new technologies within the P-POD platform, including power-on capability and more notably, wireless communication. StangSat will stream its telemetry data in real-time via WiFi to CP9 during launch, violating the existing CubeSat specification prohibiting RF within the P-POD.  Demonstrating wireless communication within the P-POD can benefit future missions that do not wish to develop satellite-to-ground radio links.  These type of missions can utilize another CubeSat to downlink their data and possibly avoid the necessity of developing a complicated radio. CP9 has the potential to evolve into this reusable intermediate platform.

 

ISX


ISX’s (Ionospheric Scintillation eXplorer) primary mission is to study the multi-frequency radio wave interference produced by the atmosphere at sunset near the equator. The spacecraft will receive multiple broadcast digital television channels to probe the ionospheric irregularities. 

The project began in 2015 as a joint effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. SRI is responsible for the payload design and construction, and the interpretation of mission data. Cal Poly is responsible for the CubeSat design and construction, and ground station operations. ISX is Cal Poly’s 11th CubeSat (CP11) and is a 3U configuration, based off the Cal Poly Tesseract Structure, optimized for ease of machining and assembly. ISX is scheduled for launch in November 2017.