CP1


Comm Frequency: 436.845 MHz

Modulation:  DTMF

Comm Output Power : 300 mW

Project Status: Satellite complete and delivered, Dnepr 1 rocket failure

Satellite Name:  CP1

School:  California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission: Sun Sensor, and Magnetic Torquer

Launch Date:  July 26, 2006

 

Project History:

CP1 is Cal Poly's first satellite. Jack Schaffner won a paper writing contest for SmallSat to kick off PolySat.

Mission:

The primary mission of CP1 was the testing of a sun sensor donated by Optical Energy technologies, as well as the use of a single magnetic torquer embedded within a side panel. Being the first satellite built by Cal Poly, emphasis was placed on building a progressive program relying on documentation and the passing of knowledge and skills.

Launch:

CP1 launched July 26th, 2006 on the Dnepr 1 mission. The satellite unfortunately did not make it to orbit due to a rocket failure. 

 

CP2


Comm Frequency: 437.325 MHz

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: ~500 MW

Project Status: Satellite Complete and delivered, DNEPR 1 Rocket Failure

Satellite Name: CP2

School: California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission Energy Dissipation Experiment, CP Bus test

Launch Date: July 26, 2006

 

Project History:

CP2 is Cal Poly’s second satellite. Development began around Fall of 2003 and was officially called “done” in March of 2005. The team behind CP2 contained engineers from several disciplines, including Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Aerospace Engineering. Many lessons were learned from the design and construction of CP1 and put to good use with CP2.

Mission

The primary missions of CP2 were an energy dissipation experiment as well as a field-test of what we have dubbed the CP Bus. CP2 marks our first attempt at “standardizing” a CubeSat bus to enable easier integration of a wide variety of payloads.

Launch

CP2 launched July 26th, 2006 on the Dnepr 1 mission. The satellite unfortunately did not make it to orbit due to rocket failure. See CP4 and the Dnepr 2 launch.

 

CP3


Comm Frequency: 436.845 MHz

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: ~500 mW

Project Status: Launched and Operational

Satellite Name: CP3

School: California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission Attitude Determination and Control using 2-Axis Magnetometers and Magnetorquers

Launch Date: April 17th, 2007

 

Project History

Development of CP3 began in the Summer of 2005 and completed in time for the Dnepr 2 launch. The CP3 engineering team is composed of students from several disciplines including Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Physics and Aerospace Engineering. The standard bus developed for CP2 was used for CP3 to validate the concept of a standard CubeSat bus to accomodate any payload.

Mission

The primary mission of CP3 is to implement an attitude control system using only magnetic torquers embedded within the side panels. Attitude determination is performed using two-axis magnetometers on each side panel as well as observation imagers on the payload face. As with all of our CubeSats, a primary mission is also education. Our project is student-run and we aim to design, build, launch and operate a satellite with as much student involvement as possible.

Launch

CP3 launched April 17th, 2007 the on the Dnepr 2 mission. For more information about the progress of the mission see Dnepr 2 launch. The backup model of CP3 has been modified and renamed CP6.

 

CP4


Comm Frequency: 437.325 MHz

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: ~500 mW

Project Status: Launched and Semi-Operational, C&DH processor    

lock-up issue

Satellite Name: CP4

School: California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission Energy Dissipation Experiment, CP Bus test

Launch Date: April 17th, 2007

 

Launch

The satellite launched under the name CP4 is the backup flight model of CP2. Please see the CP2 page for information about the satellite and its mission, or the Dnepr 2 page for launch information.

 

CP5


Modulation: AFSK on LSB

Encoding and Protocol: AX.25 over NRZI at 1200 baud

Beacon: Every 2 minutes, begins 3.5 hours after first turn-on

Comm Output Power: 0.5 W

Project Status: Launched on ELaNa-6 OUTSat NROL-36 Atlas V Mission from Vandenberg AFB on September 13

Satellite Name: CP5

School: California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission Summary: De-Orbiting Experiment Using A Deployed Thin-Film Mechanism

Launch Date: September 13, 2012

Comm Frequency: 437.405 MHz

 

Project History

Project development began in 2007, and has been through several revisions and worked on by various teams. The final team completed development in December 2011 to prepare for integration on the ELaNa-6 mission. The program was extended well-beyond its desired completion date, as with most projects. However, the team envisions a successful sail deployment and de-orbit of the spacecraft after deployment from NROL-36.

Launch

CP5 has launched aboard the OUTSat NROL-36 Atlas V Mission!

Operations and Tracking

CP5 is ground-operated with a software TNC known as MixW (more information can be found at the “Earth Station” link at the top of the page), and Yaesu FT-847 and ICOM IC-910 radios. Additionally, a Python-based decoder is used as the primary operations application on the ground station, which is GUI based and can support data acquisition from multiple ground stations. If you’re interested in helping to track and acquire data from CP5, more information can be found on our MoreDBs page.

TLE

Current TLE for CP5 is available here.

First Beacon

Audio Wav File (beacon recorded by Tetsu-JA0CAW)

Parsed Beacon Data

 

CP6


Launch Date: May 19th, 2009

Comm Frequency: 437.365 MHz

Modulation: FSK on SSB, the satellite was tuned to 437.365 LSB

Comm Output Power: ~1W

Project Status: CP6 has deorbited and is no longer operational.

Satellite Name: CP6

School: California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission Attitude Determination and Control using 2-Axis Magnetometers and Magnetorquers

Secondary Mission Electron collection experiment by Naval Research Laboratory

 

 

Project History

CP6 development started when it was discovered that CP3 had low receive sensitivity issues. The backup flight unit of CP3 has since been modified with an LNA on the radio to increase uplink reliability, more robust software, and the addition of a secondary payload experiment built by NRL. The resulting satellite has been named CP6 and is now ready for launch.

Mission

The primary mission of CP6 is to implement an attitude control system using only magnetic torquers embedded within the side panels. Attitude determination is performed using two-axis magnetometers on each side panel as well as observation imagers on the payload face. Once the primary objectives have been met, a command will be sent to deploy the secondary payload that consists of a series of spring steel tapes. The data will be used to guide the future design of an electrodynamic tether.

Launch

CP6 has been launched. See NASA’s Tacsat-3 site for more information.

 

QSL Card

The PolySat team is extremely grateful for the time and energy that has been dedicated by amateur radio operators around the world.

 

CP8 (IPEX)


Comm Frequency: 437.270 MHz

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: ~1 W

Project Status: Mission objectives achieved. IPEX is no longer operating.

Satellite Name: CP8 (IPEX)

School: California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

Mission JPL Autonomous Image Processing

Launch Date: December 5th, 2013

 

Project History

  • Collaboration with JPL began in 2012.

  • 1st Balloon Launch of CP8 Balloon Unit: July 28th, 2012

  • 2nd Balloon Launch of CP8 Balloon Unit: December 9th, 2012

  • Launch Date is December, 2013

Mission

IPEX is a 1U (10 x 10 x 10 cm) cubesat, funded by NASA’s Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO), designed to validate onboard instrument processing and autonomous payload operations for the proposed NASA HYperSPectral Infra-Red Instrument (HyspIRI) mission.

IPEX carries several low-resolution (3 mega pixels) Omnivision OV3642 cameras as a stand in for actual science instruments on future NASA missions. These cameras are capable of acquiring many images (several per minute) over the mission lifetime providing data to validate onboard processing.

These images will be processed onboard using the Atmel™ primary flight processor as well as the Gumstix™ Earth Storm instrument processor in order to demonstrate near continuous onboard instrument processing. The Continuous Activity Scheduler, Planner Execution and Replanner (CASPER), Specialized onboard planning software developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, will control the image acquisition and image processing and run on the Atmel processor.

The IPEX spacecraft and core flight software is developed by California Polytechnic University at San Luis Obispo. The IPEX spacecraft has solar panels on all six sides for power generation, three battery packs for power storage, and a custom designed deployable antenna for communications. Primary communications will be over the UHF band; the satellite will automatically beacon satellite health data which will be decodable by the amateur community. After the mission lifespan, the satellite will be put into digipeter mode for use by amateur operators. The primary flight computer is a 400MHz Atmel  T91SAM9:ARM9™ with the processor card carrying 128 MB RAM and a 16GB SD card for data storage. The payload processor is a Gumstix Earth Storm with 512MB RAM and 512MB flash as well as second 16GB SD card.

The principal elements of the IPEX hardware and flight software have been tested with two balloon flights 28 July 2012 and 09 December 2012 with approximately four hours flight time and reaching over 100,000 feet above sea level.

IPEX was launched into Low Earth Orbit on an Atlas V rocket from Vandenberg
Air Force Base in December 5th 2013. After attaining orbit, the IPEX spacecraft self stabilized using passive magnets mounted in the IPEX structure. After stabilization, IPEX is commanded from the earth station at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. During the IPEX flight, imaging and image processing requests will be processed automatically by earth automation software that will develope observation, processing, and downlink plans from requests and an encoded operations models without need for human intervention. This automated, web-based operations is a key part of the IPEX mission.

 

CP10 (ExoCube)


Comm Frequency: 437.270 MHz

Modulation: FSK

Comm Output Power: ~1 W 

Project Status: Launched and deployed successfully, however issue with antenna has hindered normal operations. Satellite was operated successfully using large dishes at SRI and Wallops. Beacons are still detected, however normal operations is not currently being persued.

Satellite Name: CP10 (ExoCube)

School: California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Mission: Measuring the Elemental Composition of the Exosphere

Launch Date: January 31st, 2015

 

Overview

ExoCube is a space weather satellite sponsored by the National Science Foundation. It’s primary mission is to directly measure the density of Hydrogen, Oxygen, Helium and Nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Cal Poly is designing the core satellite bus, while the scientific payload is supplied by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The University of Wisconsin, Madison and Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI) are developing the scientific objectives and providing guidance for instrument development.

Mission

The ExoCube scientific payload includes a scientific instrument that is developed by NASA GSFC, in collaboration with University of Wisconsin, Madison, Scientific Solutions, Inc., and Cal Poly.  ExoCube will characterize [O], [H], [He], [N2], [O+], [H+], [He+], [NO+], and total ion density by taking in-situ measurements within the exosphere, while taking particular interest in orbital locations above various radio observatories.  ExoCube uses an active control system to point itself in the desired direction for measurements, and uses passive control to maintain this orientation.